Lookin’ Ass Nigga: A Hip Hop Anthem for Women


by Mehgan Abdelmassih NickiMinaj

Nicki Minaj’s “Lookin Ass Nigga” has made men the silent dancers and twerkers in hip hop videos. The song has finally given us ladies a beat to work with in the club where we can shake our asses with absolute attitude. Finally, we have that one anthem that has nothing to do with being a single lady, but rather a song that points out a reality that men and women know exist, but one that neither party, especially women, do not explicitly and publically broadcast in a rap song.

Ms. Minaj, I am going to totally assume that you anticipated a response from a male rapper, known or unknown in the community, to your song. I am going to also assume that Cassidy’s response did not faze you, because honestly, it did not faze me.

(Nicki's Song w/ Lyrics / Cassidy's Version w/ Lyrics)

Cassidy released “Lookin Ass Bitches” a couple of days after Minaj’s song debuted. While Minaj’s song focuses on calling out men who show-off, brag, and straight up lie about their non-existent exotic and lavish lifestyles, Cassidy’s song focuses on female sexuality, and basically, nothing else.

My favorite line from Cassidy’s remix would have to be, “They whore ass bitches, coming out they panties to/get a mani and pedicure ass bitches.” And my favorite line from Minaj’s would have to be, “Even if that nigga flew me and my bitches all the all the way out to Dubai/Pussy, you tried, pussy ass nigga you lied.” Compare and contrast these two lines against each other, and it certainly demonstrates how the two rappers rely on different aspects of the ideal male and female individual. And while Cassidy’s song reduces females to an untamable sexual object, which is commonplace in hip hop culture, Minaj’s attacks the very core of the male ego: his biz-nass.

And Cassidy did not shock me nor did he impress me, because the very lines he threw out there have already been said. Hell, DJ Self made it the catch phrase in “Yeah OK”. Remember it? “Your Instagram is a liar.”

Even if my assumption was wrong about you anticipating backlash, Ms. Minaj, I certainly anticipated a response from the male audience. I actually had high hopes for it, too. But I am glad that I can rock out to your song in 1OAK rather than a song that says that, “If he liked it then he shoulda put a ring on it,” because all that song really did was perpetuate that age-ol’ idea that us women are, at the end of the day, just some gals trying to get hitched.

And yeah, if they play Cassidy’s remix in the club, I will probably dance to it, just like I dance to “No Hands” by Waka Flocka Flame, “Sweat” by Bow Wow, and Chris Brown’s “Loyal”. These songs all do the same thing Cassidy’s did: call out women for being big ol’ schemin’ hoes. Fortunately, I personally surround myself with women who are intellectually capable of overlooking the sexist lyrics that plague hip-hop, and instead, focus on the quality of the beat.

But honestly, thank you. We gals needed that song. Beat, lyrics, and guns.